Vaccine Protocols

Vaccinations are the cornerstone of preventive health.   

They can protect people and their pets for life from illnesses or death and they are one of the best ways to prepare

dogs’ and cats’ immune systems to stop diseases.  For the vast majority of pets,

the benefits of vaccinating far outweigh the risks.

 

Protecting your pet and protecting the pets around us are the top two reasons to vaccinate.   

Canine and feline diseases still exist and can infect any unprotected pet at any time.

A successful vaccination program depends on the cooperation of every individual.

 

 

 

 

Canine Vaccine Protocol

 

Ultra Duramune DAP Vaccine (Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 2, Parvovirus):

Dickinson County Animal Clinic recommends starting the DAP vaccine at 6-8 weeks of age.  This is followed by a booster given every 3-4 weeks until the puppy is 16 weeks, with the final 2 vaccines coming after 12 weeks.  The final puppy booster expires in one year. At this time, if there has been no lapse in coverage, the dog is eligible for a DAP vaccine lasting for 3 years.

 

Rabies Vaccine:  

Puppies must be at least 12 weeks of age for their first vaccination, followed by a booster vaccination one year later.  If the rabies vaccine is updated on or before the due date, your dog will be eligible to receive a 3 year rabies vaccination.  The state of Iowa’s rabies vaccine requirements state that if you allow a pet’s rabies vaccine to expire, your veterinarian is required to give your pet a 1 year vaccine.

 

Bronchi-Shield Oral Vaccine or Bronchicine Vaccine (Bordetella):  

Bordetella is commonly known as kennel cough. Puppies must be at least 6 weeks of age for their first vaccination followed by annual Bordetella boosters.  In most cases, this vaccination is given orally.

 

Recombitek Lyme Vaccine (Borrelia Burgdorferia):  

Puppies must be at least 9 weeks of age for the first Lyme vaccination, followed by a booster vaccination in 2-3 weeks.  Lyme boosters are given annually after the last puppy vaccine. This protocol also applies to dogs starting the Lyme vaccine as adults.

 

LeptoVax 4 Vaccine (Leptospirosis):  

Puppies must be at least 8 weeks of age for the first Leptospirosis vaccination, followed by a booster vaccination in 2-3 weeks.  Lepto boosters are given annually after the last puppy vaccine. This protocol also applies to dogs starting the Leptospirosis vaccine as adults.

 

Canine Influenza, H3N2 & H3N8 Vaccine:

Healthy dogs 8 weeks of age or older should receive 2 doses administered 3 weeks apart.  After the initial series, the Canine Influenza vaccination is administered yearly.

 

In addition to vaccines, we recommend testing your dog for parasites.  With a small blood sample we are able to check your dog for the presence of heartworms as well as 3 tick borne diseases (anaplasmosis, ehrlichia, and lyme.)  A stool sample can be checked microscopically for the presence of intestinal worms including: roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, tapeworms and coccidia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feline Vaccine Protocol

 

Ultra Fel-O-Vax FVRCP Vaccine (Feline Rhinotracheitis, Calici, Panleukopenia):

Dickinson County Animal Clinic recommends giving the first FVRCP vaccine at 10 weeks of age, followed by a booster in approximately once a month. This second vaccine expires in 1 year.  At this time, if there is no lapse in coverage, the cat is eligible for an FVRCP vaccine lasting for 3 years.

 

Rabies Vaccine:  

Kittens must be at least 12 weeks of age for their first vaccination, followed by a booster vaccination one year later.  If the rabies vaccine is updated on or before the due date, your cat will be eligible to receive a 3 year rabies vaccination.  The state of Iowa’s rabies vaccine requirements state that if you allow a pet’s rabies vaccine to expire, your veterinarian is required to give your pet a 1 year vaccine.

 

Feline Leukemia Vaccine:  

Kittens must be at least 10 weeks of age to receive their first Feline Leukemia vaccination, followed by a booster in 3-4 weeks.  After the initial boosters, this vaccine is given annually..

 

In addition to vaccines, we recommend testing your cat for specific feline viruses and parasites.  With a small blood sample we are able to test your cat for the presence of the Feline leukemia virus and Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).  A stool sample can be checked microscopically for the presence of intestinal worms including: roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms and coccidia.